NICOLE ENGLAND
 

NICOLE HAS BEEN EXPLORING THE BUILT FORM, AND THE WAY SPACES ARE USED IN HER CAREER, FOR OVER 10 YEARS.

“We always used to talk about architecture around the dinner table when I was growing up. I found it incredibly boring at the time. The photography of people was my passion, Robert Frank and Richard Avedon my inspiration.

But with hindsight, it seems only natural that those family conversations would rub off and that the very places where people live and work would become important for me to explore.”

Nicole is in her element capturing the fleeting moments.

When the sun is setting, the light changing minute to minute, as the building seems to come alive in front of her very eyes. In the split second when a dog walks unexpectedly into frame, instantly invigorating the shot. Or when she’s hanging precariously over a balustrade to get just the right aerial composition.

So it might be a surprise that her work is defined by such a sense of calm, that her approach is patient and methodical – stemming from her early years shooting on film – and that she’s a relaxed Kiwi through and through.

But her ability to capture both the magic of the transient moment and the essential, unchanging qualities of space, form, texture, and detail is what gives Nicole’s photography its power. Finding the clarity in complexity and emotion in the material.

Some of this is innate, from a childhood immersed in architecture and design. Much of it is honed through experience and education, from her degree in Fine Arts to her previous life spent working in the publishing industry and now over a decade as a professional photographer of architecture and interiors.

When Nicole isn’t shooting architecture and design for work, she can be found photographing personal projects – most of which have an architectural focus. The best known of these is Resident Dog, which grew to become a book that captured the hearts of dog and design lovers around the world.